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Monday, April 03, 2017

EXPLANATION OF APGAR SCORE IN NEWBORN

 If you've ever been pregnant or if you are currently pregnant, you've probably heard of the Apgar score which is an assessment of the baby's condition and birth and shortly thereafter.  This article explains what it is and how it is calculated.  Read more:

The Apgar score, the very first test given to a newborn, occurs in the delivery or birthing room right
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after the baby's birth. The test was designed to quickly evaluate a newborn's physical condition and to see if there's an immediate need for extra medical or emergency care.

Although the Apgar score was developed in 1952 by an anesthesiologist named Virginia Apgar, you also might hear it referred to as an acronym for: Appearance, Pulse, Grimace, Activity, and Respiration.
The Apgar test is usually given to a baby twice: once at 1 minute after birth, and again at 5 minutes after birth. Sometimes, if there are concerns about the baby's condition or the score at 5 minutes is low, the test may be scored for a third time at 10 minutes after birth.
Five factors are used to evaluate the baby's condition and each factor is scored on a scale of 0 to 2, with 2 being the best score:
  1. Appearance (skin color)
  2. Pulse (heart rate)
  3. Grimace response (reflexes)
  4. Activity (muscle tone)
  5. Respiration (breathing rate and effort)
Doctors, midwives, or nurses combine these five factors for the Apgar score, which will be between 10 and 0 — 10 is the highest score possible, but it's rarely obtained.

Apgar Scoring

Apgar Sign 2 1 0

Appearance
(skin color)
Normal color all over (hands and feet are pink) Normal color (but hands and feet are bluish) Bluish-gray or pale all over

Pulse
(heart rate)
Normal (above 100 beats per minute) Below 100 beats per minute Absent
(no pulse)

Grimace
("reflex irritability")
Pulls away, sneezes, coughs, or cries with stimulation Facial movement only (grimace) with stimulation Absent (no response to stimulation)

Activity
(muscle tone)
Active, spontaneous movement Arms and legs flexed with little movement No movement, "floppy" tone

Respiration
(breathing rate and effort)

from: kidshealth.org
Normal rate and effort, good cry Slow or irregular breathing, weak cry Absent (no breathing)

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