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Friday, March 25, 2011

Maternity Air Mattresses

Pregnancy Over 40, Comfort With Air Mattress

Sleeping when you're pregnant can be very difficult. It's hard to find the right position and support that also allows for a larger belly.
My site: www.getpregnantover40.com
 I had my old waterbed which I loved (I unplugged it when I was in it). However there are other alternatives. This article talks about the maternity air mattress. Read morE:

www.paintedgold.com

From the site:


If a maternity air bed can help a pregnant mom get a reasonably comfortable night sleep, I'm all for it. The maternity bed (one product is called the Gentle Air Maternity Bed) is a straightforward idea developed by an ob/gyn. It's an inflatable air bed with a pregnant tummy-sized hole in the middle of it. The hole apparently comes with an inflatable pillow so you can adjust the size and firmness of the tummy-opening.

Sounds intriguing, doesn't it?

However, the real question is, does this idea actually work? Does a maternity air bed help pregnant women sleep better? Understanding that no one solution will work for everyone, I would still love to know if this product is helpful.

I have looked online at pregnancy forums, listening to moms who have used a maternity air bed or the Gentle Air Maternity air bed.

* Most of the women had positive things to say about the maternity bed.
* Most who have used it reported less back and leg pain and better sleep overall, which is great news.
* There were some women who were not happy with the air bed, stating that it simply wasn't comfortable.

Thursday, March 24, 2011

STRANGE EARLY PREGNANCY SYMPTOMS - UNUSUAL SIGNS OF PREGNANCY

Pregnancy Over 40, Unusual Symptoms

Everyone is different and each pregnancy is different.  Many women experience symptoms that you may not necessarily associate with pregnancy itself.
See Also: getpregnantover40.com for more on pregnancy over 40 and pregnancy after miscarriage
 People who have had a number of children will tell you that some pregnancies cause many unpleasant symptoms and others do not.

Every pregnancy is different and will have its own set of symptoms

I felt butterflies in my abdomen as early as a couple of days after a positive pregnancy test.  Even though I was told it was impossible, I felt my baby kick at 9 weeks (impossible or not, I know what I felt!)  I had horrible nausea with all of my pregnancies (even though I miscarried a number of times and "older" women aren't supposed to get as much nausea as younger women).  Even my successful pregnancy had nausea for the entire first trimester.  When I hit about 12 weeks, the nausea finally lifted.

Here are a number of other symptoms you may not have heard of:
Click Here To Read Full Article on early pregnancy symptoms and ways to know you are pregnant (getpregnantover40.com




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Friday, March 18, 2011

Raising Respectful Children


I was at the library with my daughter the other day and while she was at the "coloring" table, another little boy told her that she didn't color very good. His 6 year old brother immediately chimes in by saying, "she's doing a good job!"

I was very impressed by his thoughtfulness. Even a 6 year old can be respectful of other people's feelings. Here is an article about raising respectful children:

Helping Children Develop Character (earlychildhoodsnews.com

Here are some suggestions from the article:

How can teachers and caregivers apply these lessons from research on a daily basis? We can promote positive character traits in children by purposefully interacting with them in authoritative ways. Here are some suggestions:

* Listen to children. Really listen. Physically get down on the child's level. Establish eye contact. Ask questions. Remember what you've heard.

* Set high but reasonable standards. If standards are stated as rules, keep them short, specific, and positive. Example: Walk indoors; or wear a paint shirt at the easel.

* Explain why. Tell Jason why he cannot swing and slash the air with a wooden ruler. Example: I am worried that your friends might get hurt with the ruler. Please use it to measure.

* Negotiate a reasonable solution. Solutions should enable the child to fulfill his or her goals whenever possible. Example: Max wants to help Sam work a puzzle, but Sam wants to do it alone. Help Sam explain his point of view and ask if he would tell Max when he is finished using the puzzle.

* Ask. Never jump to conclusions about the motives behind a child's behavior. Give the child a chance to explain. We all deserve a hearing or chance to tell our side. Example: Kathy, why are you pulling the chair out from under Rachel?

* Offer real choices. Children should be able to select the centers and activities in which they wish to participate. They may be given choices about which story to have read, whether they want carrots or celery for snack, or which friend to sit beside during group meetings. Sometimes choices need to be limited to acceptable options only. Example: You may hammer at the workbench or you may work at another center. If you choose to hammer then you must wear goggles to be safe. Do you choose the workbench and goggles or do you choose another center?

* Value ideas and opinions. Ask, "What do you think of that?" Story times may offer many opportunities for children to express their thoughts as they discuss story characters and events. Children can also be asked their opinions about daily happenings in casual conversations.

* Encourage independence. Provide materials and supplies where children can get to them on their own. Encourage children to try to take care of their own self-help needs. Resist the temptation to do those small but important tasks for children. A child can button his or her own paint shirt, zip his or her own coat (after you get it started), put his or her art work in his or her own school bag, and write as much of his or her own name on paintings as possible.

* Use redirection. Redirection and diversion are particularly effective with the very young. Example: The caregiver might entice the child to become interested in a different activity or suggest trying the same activity with a variation. When using redirection and diversion the caregiver might spend a few minutes playing with the child to move play in a more positive direction.

Friday, March 04, 2011

Reading To Kids: They Take It Literally



I recall being told to start reading to my daughter back when she was only 6 months old. We read tons of baby and children's books, even though I knew she couldn't understand most of it. Many of these books don't include factual information because they're fun an whimsical. However according to the article below, kids may take the information they read (or that is read to them) and truly believe it.

Tots, don't believe everything you read (www.latimes.com)

From the above article:

Fifty-two children listened to stories over headphones while looking at illustrations. They were then asked a series of questions (such as, "what's another word for autumn? Is it spring or fall?"). In some cases, but not all, these questions pertained to information that had come up in the stories. The results showed that children answered these questions correctly most often when they had heard a true version of the story, less often when the story hadn't discussed the topic, and least often when it gave wrong information.

Older children volunteered wrong answers more often than younger kids did (13% versus 6%) when the questions were presented as fill-in-the-blank format. The littlest ones, meanwhile, chose false "facts" more often in multiple-choice questions (27% versus 21%). The authors say this is because older children have better memories — meaning they can recall more general knowledge when asked to pick from a list but that they also "lock in" the brand-new information they hear better than younger kids, even when that information isn't true.

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