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Friday, April 18, 2014

WHAT TO TELL CHILDREN CONCEIVED THROUGH IVF OR FERTILITY TREATMENTS

Difficulty Getting Pregnant Over 40 Doesn't Have To Be A Secret

I fully plan to tell my daughter how long we waited for her and how happy we were when she finally came into the world.  Even though she was conceived naturally, I still plan to tell her about our challenges getting pregnant. My hope is that she won't make some of the same mistakes I made and she will grow up with a better attitude toward family and children than I had for most of my adult life.Many couples who conceived through IVF wonder how much they should share with their child/children. Here are my recommendations:
  • Assuming you did not use donor eggs, or ICSI, let you child know that the doctors helped the egg and sperm get to each other, but the fertilization was natural. 
  • Let your child know that you wanted them very much and you wanted to do whatever was necessary to bring them into the world
  • Let your child know that approximately half of all pregnancies are unplanned.  For them, it was very well planned and you were ready in every way for their arrival.  
  • I find that whether or not a child was conceived through assisted reproduction, it is important for me to constantly tell my daughter that she's the best thing that ever happened to me.  Even though she knows I love her, she just beams when I tell her that.  Coming myself from a family with parents who never once said "I love you" or showed affection, I know how important it is to always verbalize these things to your child.  
 SEE ALSO: SHARING INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR FERTILITY(getpregnantover40.com)

WHAT CHEMICALS AND TOXINS TO AVOID IN PREGNANCY OR WHEN TRYING TO GET PREGNANT

Environmental Chemicals and Threats To Fertility

If you are trying to conceive or already pregnant, it is extra important to avoid certain toxic chemicals which we may come in contact with on a day to day basis. It can be very confusing since many of these toxins are listed in the fine print of the products we buy.  Even some so called "natural" products can be very misleading.  Consumers need to be extra careful about sunscreens, cosmetics, nail polish, plastics, cleaning products and so on.  This site discusses some ways to detoxify your environment if you're trying to conceive or pregnant:

Environmental Threats To Fertility and Pregnancy (getpregnantover40.com)

Thursday, April 17, 2014

TRYING TO GET PREGNANT? HOW MUCH INFORMATION DO YOU SHARE?

Sharing information about your fertility and getting pregnant

No matter what your age, when you are trying to get pregnant, you need to decide how much information you are willing to share with others.  Of course, I usually deal with women and couples who are trying to conceive over 40 and, even though I feel it is totally possible to achieve a pregnancy at this age, it does take older couples longer to conceive than younger ones.  Whether or not you've decided to undergo fertility treatments, it can be extremely embarrassing for others to ask about whether or not you are going to have kids or whether or not you've had any luck trying to conceive.  Getting pregnant involves the most private bodily functions and it really does feel like a violation of privacy when others pry into your personal business.  So how do you handle this?
CLICK HERE TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE ON SHARING INFORMATION ABOUT TRYING TO CONCEIVE (getpregnantover40.com)

RINGING IN EARS: COULD IT MEAN YOU'RE PREGNANT?

Ringing In Ears in Pregnancy

Ringing in ears is also called "tinnitus". and sometimes it can occur in pregnancy.  I have had a few bouts with ear ringing and I must say it can range anywhere from annoying to infuriating.  Many women who are pregnancy may experience ear ringing.  Sometimes the hormonal changes associated with pregnancy can cause the condition and it is thought that just the awareness that your ears are ringing can make your perception of the condition worse.

Click Here To REad The Full Article on Ringing In Ears In Pregnancy
 (getpregnantover40.com) 

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

BLOOD TEST TO DETERMINE GENDER OF PREGNANCY

Blood test can determine baby's sex early in pregnancy

Good news for parents who can't wait to find out the sex of their baby. There is now a blood tests that can be done in early pregnancy which appears to be very accurate.  Of course, there are critics who think that some couples may terminate pregnancies if they had there hearts set on a boy or a girl.

For more on pregnancy over 40 and prevening miscarriage and other complications, visit: getpregnantover40.com 

 However, the test may eliminate the need for other more invasive screening procedures:
 Read more:

Most importantly, it appears to be 100 percent accurate, say Dutch researchers whose findings were reported in Monday’s edition of the journal Obstetrics and Gynecology.
The Dutch study took place over the course of five years, from 2003 to 2009 and included 201 expectant mothers referred by geneticists or gynecologists in the Netherlands. Of 201 women tested, the researchers were able to issue a conclusion 189 times. They were correct every time.
The technique is less a breakthrough than a continuation of successful research and trials that have brought such non-invasive fetal testing to the brink of wide commercialization, said Dr. Diana Bianchi, the Natalie V. Zucker professor of pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology at Tufts University. Bianchi is not affiliated with the Dutch study. 
www.msnbc.com

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

HANDLING YOUR CAT IN PREGNANCY

Pregnancy Over 40, Handle Cats Safely

Even though cats may carry a parasitic disease called toxoplasmosis, if pregnant women take the right precautions, they can safely keep their pets.

For more on environmental factors which may affect fertility and pregnancy, visit www.getpregnantover40.com

The following article discusses pregnancy, babies and cats:


Because toxoplasmosis can cause birth defects in children, pregnant women sometimes assume that they must get rid of their cat. This is entirely unnecessary, as a few simple measures will thoroughly safeguard against catching the disease, especially from your cat. Toxoplasmosis is a disease caused by a parasite that can infect your cat if she eats prey already harboring the parasite or comes into contact with contaminated soil. Toxoplasmosis is rare among indoor-only cats.
Note that cats who contract toxoplasmosis do not always show symptoms. To prevent getting infected with the disease, whenever you scoop or clean the litter box, wear disposable gloves and wash your hands immediately afterward. Even better, get a friend or adult member of the family to take over litter box maintenance while Mom is pregnant.

Eating raw or undercooked meat is the most common way that humans contract toxoplasmosis. If you eat meat, wash off all surfaces and utensils that touched raw meat, and don't prepare meat and raw foods like salads on the same cutting board. Wash your hands thoroughly after handling raw meat.

If you garden, wear gloves when working in the soil. The toxoplasmosis parasite lives in the dirt, so also wash your hands well after gardening. Many people naturally acquire an immunity to toxoplasmosis, and will not pass it on to their unborn child. Your doctor can test to see if you are in this group. 


from about.com

CHICKEN POX BEFORE AND IN PREGNANCY


Chicken Pox - What You Should Know About This Infectious Disease

Chicken Pox - What You Should Know About This Infectious Disease

Guest Post By Heather Colman


Chicken pox is the common name for Varicella simplex, classically one of the childhood infectious diseases caught and survived by most children.
Chicken pox is caused by the varicella-zoster virus. It starts with moderate fever and then characteristic spots appearing in two or three waves, mainly on the body and head rather than the hands and becoming itchy raw pox (pocks), small open sores which heal mostly without scarring.
This infectious disease has a two-week incubation period and is highly contagious by air transmission two days before symptoms appear. Therefore, it spreads quickly through schools and other places of close contact.
Once someone has been infected with the disease, they usually develop protective immunity for life. It is fairly rare to get the chicken pox multiple times, but it is possible for people with irregular immune systems.
As the disease is more severe if contracted by an adult, parents have been known to ensure their children become infected before adulthood.

_______________
See also:  Chicken Pox and Men's Fertility (getpregnantover40.com)
_______________

The disease can be fatal. Pregnant women and those with immune system depression are more at risk. Death is usually from varicella pneumonia. In the US, 55 percent of chicken pox deaths were in the over-20 age group. Pregnant women not known to be immune and who come into contact with chicken pox should contact their doctor immediately, as the virus can cause serious problems for the fetus.
A vaccine has been available since 1995, and is now required in some countries for children to be admitted into elementary school. In addition, effective medications (e.g., aciclovir) are available to treat healthy and immunocompromised persons. Calamine lotion is often used to ease itching and paracetamol to reduce fever. Aspirin is not recommended in children as it can lead to Reye's syndrome.
Chicken pox is an infection that spreads from person to person by direct contact or through the air from an infected person's coughing or sneezing. Touching the fluid from a chicken pox blister can also spread the disease. A person is contagious 1-2 days before the rash appears and until all blisters have formed scabs. This may take between 5-10 days. It takes from 10-21 days after contact with an infected person for someone to develop the disease.
The blisters start as a small red papule which develops an irregular outline in the shape of a rose petal. A thin-walled, clear vesicle (dew drop) develops on top of the area of redness. This "dew drop on a rose petal" lesion is very characteristic for chicken pox. After about 8-12 hours the fluid in the vesicle gets cloudy and the vesicle breaks leaving a crust. The fluid is highly contagious, but once the lesion crusts over, it is not considered contagious. The crust usually falls off after 7 days sometimes leaving a craterlike scar.
Although one lesion goes through this complete cycle in about 7 days, another hallmark of chicken pox is the fact that new lesions crop up every day for several days. Therefore, it may take about a week until new lesions stop appearing and existing lesions crust over.
Second infections with occur in immunocompetent individuals, but are uncommon and rarely severe.
Japan was among the first countries to routinely vaccinate for chicken pox. Routine vaccination against varicella zoster virus is also performed in the United States, and the incidence of chicken pox has been dramatically reduced from 4 million cases per year in the pre-vaccine era to approximately 400,000 cases per year as of 2005.
The vaccine is exceedingly safe: approximately 5% of children who receive the vaccine develop a fever or rash, but there have been no deaths, as of May 2006, attributable to the vaccine despite more than 40 million doses being administered.
41 of the 50 US states require immunization for children attending government- run schools. The vaccination is not routine in the United Kingdom. Debate continues in the UK on the time when it will be desirable to adopt routine vaccination, and in the US opinions that it should be dropped, individually, or along with all immunizations, are also voiced.
The CDC and corresponding national organisations are carefully observing the failure rate which may be high compared with other modern vaccines - large outbreaks of chicken pox having occurred at schools which required their children to be vaccinated.
Catching wild chicken pox as a child has been thought to commonly result in lifelong immunity. Parents have deliberately ensured this in the past with pox parties and similarly for some other diseases such as rubella.
Historically, exposure of adults to contagious children has boosted their immunity, reducing the risk of shingles.
Disclaimer: This article should not be substituted for medical advice. Please  talk to a qualified professional for more information about chicken pox.
[Copyright � 2007, Heather Colman.  Find more of Heather's articles at eBook Palace. Her articles are available for syndication. Reprinting individual articles is permissible provided no changes are made.]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Heather_Colman


http://EzineArticles.com/?Chicken-Pox---What-You-Should-Know-About-This-Infectious-Disease&id=602068






Chicken Pox - What You Should Know About This Infectious Disease



Chicken Pox - What You Should Know About This Infectious Disease

By Heather Colman


Chicken pox is the common name for Varicella simplex, classically one of the childhood infectious diseases caught and survived by most children.
Chicken pox is caused by the varicella-zoster virus. It starts with moderate fever and then characteristic spots appearing in two or three waves, mainly on the body and head rather than the hands and becoming itchy raw pox (pocks), small open sores which heal mostly without scarring.
This infectious disease has a two-week incubation period and is highly contagious by air transmission two days before symptoms appear. Therefore, it spreads quickly through schools and other places of close contact.
Once someone has been infected with the disease, they usually develop protective immunity for life. It is fairly rare to get the chicken pox multiple times, but it is possible for people with irregular immune systems.
As the disease is more severe if contracted by an adult, parents have been known to ensure their children become infected before adulthood.

_______________
See also:  Chicken Pox and Men's Fertility (getpregnantover40.com)
_______________

The disease can be fatal. Pregnant women and those with immune system depression are more at risk. Death is usually from varicella pneumonia. In the US, 55 percent of chicken pox deaths were in the over-20 age group. Pregnant women not known to be immune and who come into contact with chicken pox should contact their doctor immediately, as the virus can cause serious problems for the fetus.
A vaccine has been available since 1995, and is now required in some countries for children to be admitted into elementary school. In addition, effective medications (e.g., aciclovir) are available to treat healthy and immunocompromised persons. Calamine lotion is often used to ease itching and paracetamol to reduce fever. Aspirin is not recommended in children as it can lead to Reye's syndrome.
Chicken pox is an infection that spreads from person to person by direct contact or through the air from an infected person's coughing or sneezing. Touching the fluid from a chicken pox blister can also spread the disease. A person is contagious 1-2 days before the rash appears and until all blisters have formed scabs. This may take between 5-10 days. It takes from 10-21 days after contact with an infected person for someone to develop the disease.
The blisters start as a small red papule which develops an irregular outline in the shape of a rose petal. A thin-walled, clear vesicle (dew drop) develops on top of the area of redness. This "dew drop on a rose petal" lesion is very characteristic for chicken pox. After about 8-12 hours the fluid in the vesicle gets cloudy and the vesicle breaks leaving a crust. The fluid is highly contagious, but once the lesion crusts over, it is not considered contagious. The crust usually falls off after 7 days sometimes leaving a craterlike scar.
Although one lesion goes through this complete cycle in about 7 days, another hallmark of chicken pox is the fact that new lesions crop up every day for several days. Therefore, it may take about a week until new lesions stop appearing and existing lesions crust over.
Second infections with occur in immunocompetent individuals, but are uncommon and rarely severe.
Japan was among the first countries to routinely vaccinate for chicken pox. Routine vaccination against varicella zoster virus is also performed in the United States, and the incidence of chicken pox has been dramatically reduced from 4 million cases per year in the pre-vaccine era to approximately 400,000 cases per year as of 2005.
The vaccine is exceedingly safe: approximately 5% of children who receive the vaccine develop a fever or rash, but there have been no deaths, as of May 2006, attributable to the vaccine despite more than 40 million doses being administered.
41 of the 50 US states require immunization for children attending government- run schools. The vaccination is not routine in the United Kingdom. Debate continues in the UK on the time when it will be desirable to adopt routine vaccination, and in the US opinions that it should be dropped, individually, or along with all immunizations, are also voiced.
The CDC and corresponding national organisations are carefully observing the failure rate which may be high compared with other modern vaccines - large outbreaks of chicken pox having occurred at schools which required their children to be vaccinated.
Catching wild chicken pox as a child has been thought to commonly result in lifelong immunity. Parents have deliberately ensured this in the past with pox parties and similarly for some other diseases such as rubella.
Historically, exposure of adults to contagious children has boosted their immunity, reducing the risk of shingles.
Disclaimer: This article should not be substituted for medical advice. Please  talk to a qualified professional for more information about chicken pox.
[Copyright � 2007, Heather Colman.  Find more of Heather's articles at eBook Palace. Her articles are available for syndication. Reprinting individual articles is permissible provided no changes are made.]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Heather_Colman


http://EzineArticles.com/?Chicken-Pox---What-You-Should-Know-About-This-Infectious-Disease&id=602068








Chicken Pox - What You Should Know About This Infectious Disease



Chicken Pox - What You Should Know About This Infectious Disease

By Heather Colman


Chicken pox is the common name for Varicella simplex, classically one of the childhood infectious diseases caught and survived by most children.
Chicken pox is caused by the varicella-zoster virus. It starts with moderate fever and then characteristic spots appearing in two or three waves, mainly on the body and head rather than the hands and becoming itchy raw pox (pocks), small open sores which heal mostly without scarring.
This infectious disease has a two-week incubation period and is highly contagious by air transmission two days before symptoms appear. Therefore, it spreads quickly through schools and other places of close contact.
Once someone has been infected with the disease, they usually develop protective immunity for life. It is fairly rare to get the chicken pox multiple times, but it is possible for people with irregular immune systems.
As the disease is more severe if contracted by an adult, parents have been known to ensure their children become infected before adulthood.

_______________
See also: Chicken Pox and Men's Fertility (getpregnantover40.com)
_______________

The disease can be fatal. Pregnant women and those with immune system depression are more at risk. Death is usually from varicella pneumonia. In the US, 55 percent of chicken pox deaths were in the over-20 age group. Pregnant women not known to be immune and who come into contact with chicken pox should contact their doctor immediately, as the virus can cause serious problems for the fetus.
A vaccine has been available since 1995, and is now required in some countries for children to be admitted into elementary school. In addition, effective medications (e.g., aciclovir) are available to treat healthy and immunocompromised persons. Calamine lotion is often used to ease itching and paracetamol to reduce fever. Aspirin is not recommended in children as it can lead to Reye's syndrome.
Chicken pox is an infection that spreads from person to person by direct contact or through the air from an infected person's coughing or sneezing. Touching the fluid from a chicken pox blister can also spread the disease. A person is contagious 1-2 days before the rash appears and until all blisters have formed scabs. This may take between 5-10 days. It takes from 10-21 days after contact with an infected person for someone to develop the disease.
The blisters start as a small red papule which develops an irregular outline in the shape of a rose petal. A thin-walled, clear vesicle (dew drop) develops on top of the area of redness. This "dew drop on a rose petal" lesion is very characteristic for chicken pox. After about 8-12 hours the fluid in the vesicle gets cloudy and the vesicle breaks leaving a crust. The fluid is highly contagious, but once the lesion crusts over, it is not considered contagious. The crust usually falls off after 7 days sometimes leaving a craterlike scar.
Although one lesion goes through this complete cycle in about 7 days, another hallmark of chicken pox is the fact that new lesions crop up every day for several days. Therefore, it may take about a week until new lesions stop appearing and existing lesions crust over.
Second infections with occur in immunocompetent individuals, but are uncommon and rarely severe.
Japan was among the first countries to routinely vaccinate for chicken pox. Routine vaccination against varicella zoster virus is also performed in the United States, and the incidence of chicken pox has been dramatically reduced from 4 million cases per year in the pre-vaccine era to approximately 400,000 cases per year as of 2005.
The vaccine is exceedingly safe: approximately 5% of children who receive the vaccine develop a fever or rash, but there have been no deaths, as of May 2006, attributable to the vaccine despite more than 40 million doses being administered.
41 of the 50 US states require immunization for children attending government- run schools. The vaccination is not routine in the United Kingdom. Debate continues in the UK on the time when it will be desirable to adopt routine vaccination, and in the US opinions that it should be dropped, individually, or along with all immunizations, are also voiced.
The CDC and corresponding national organisations are carefully observing the failure rate which may be high compared with other modern vaccines - large outbreaks of chicken pox having occurred at schools which required their children to be vaccinated.
Catching wild chicken pox as a child has been thought to commonly result in lifelong immunity. Parents have deliberately ensured this in the past with pox parties and similarly for some other diseases such as rubella.
Historically, exposure of adults to contagious children has boosted their immunity, reducing the risk of shingles.
Disclaimer: This article should not be substituted for medical advice. Please talk to a qualified professional for more information about chicken pox.
[Copyright � 2007, Heather Colman. Find more of Heather's articles at eBook Palace. Her articles are available for syndication. Reprinting individual articles is permissible provided no changes are made.]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Heather_Colman


http://EzineArticles.com/?Chicken-Pox---What-You-Should-Know-About-This-Infectious-Disease&id=602068







Monday, April 14, 2014

DO YOU NEED IVF IF YOU'RE OVER 40?

IVF Over 40, Can You Get Pregnant Naturally?

Did you know that the rate of surprise pregnancies in women over the age of 40 is second only to teenagers?  Did you know that quite a few women and couples who undergo fertility treatments (including IVF) conceive naturally afterwards (either after having a child through IVF or after fertility treatments failed)?
I am a living example that a natural pregnancy is possible against seemingly insurmountable odds.  Fertility treatments left me with only one fallopian tube after I had an ectopic pregnancy and I still managed to conceive after years of infertility, fertility treatments and multiple complications from those treatments.  So, is IVF absolutely necessary if you're over the age of 40?  Well, I think it depends on your physical situation.  If you know that your tubes are blocked, IVF may be the only way around that.  If you fall into the "unexplained" category, the natural route may deserve a chance.
Click Here to Read the Full Article on IVF Over 40 (getpregnantover40.com)

STRESS LEADS TO SMALLER BABIES: AFFECTS FETAL GROWTH

Pregnancy Stress Affects Growth Of Baby

Stress not only affects fertility but it can also negatively affect a baby's growth in utero.
 See also: stress, infertility and miscarriage (and more) at getpregnantover40.com
 The stress leads to circulatory problems and can restrict bloodflow.  This article explains how stress can lead to smaller babies. Read more:


Stress and anxiety during pregnancy could cause women to have smaller babies, scientists have discovered.

They believe the effect is caused by reduced blood flow through the arteries that feed the uterus.

Doctors from the Queen Charlotte's and Chelsea Hospital in London studied 100 expectant mothers.

They found pregnant women who were more anxious or stressed had "significantly abnormal patterns of blood flow through the uterine arteries".

The findings, published in the British Medical Journal, suggest that "the psychological state of the mother may affect foetal development and therefore birth weight". 

from: 
news.bbc.co.uk

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