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Thursday, October 30, 2014

LICORICE MAY BE A PROBLEM IN PREGNANCY

 The Dangers of Licorice

With Halloween upon us and the abundance of candy everywhere for the holidays, this may be an article you should read if you're pregnant or think you might become pregnant.
 Licorice is used in many holiday recipes as decoration, but it may negatively affect fetal brain development. Read more:

SEE ALSO: FOODS FOR FERTILITY AND PREGNANCY (getpregnantover40.com)

It is thought that a component in licorice called glycyrrhizin may impair the placenta, allowing stress hormones to cross from the mother to the baby.

High levels of such hormones, known as glucocorticoids, are thought to affect fetal brain development and have been linked to behavioral disorders in children.

The results of the study are published in the American Journal of Epidemiology. Eight-year-olds whose mothers had been monitored for licorice consumption during pregnancy were tested on a range of cognitive functions including vocabulary, memory and spatial awareness.

from: www.sciencedaily.com
 

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

HOW PRIVATE IS YOUR PREGNANCY OR FERTILITY INFORMATION ONLINE?

Your privacy online and how to protect it

If you are pregnant or trying to conceive, no doubt you've done quite a few internet searches on the subject.  Let's face it, getting pregnant or being pregnant can involve some of the most private bodily functions.  You may not know it, but there's quite a bit of "data mining" software that can build a pretty accurate profile of you and your medical conditions.  So how can you protect yourself and your privacy?  Most search engines have a "private mode" or "incognito" mode, but that may be giving users a false sense of security.  There are alternatives that make you untrackable online.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE ON YOUR PRIVACY ONLINE HERE (getpregnantover40.com)

Sunday, October 26, 2014

PREGNANCY OVER 40: GETTING PAST THE NEGATIVE INFORMATION

Don't let all the negative and discouraging information get you if you are pregnant over 40 or trying to conceive over 40

Are you pregnant over the age of 40? Are you trying to conceive over the age of 40?  Not only did I run into a lot of negative information when I was trying to conceive, but I also had to endure a lot of negative "warnings" after I became pregnant with my daughter.  After years of infertility, failed fertility treatments, and finally the natural conception of my daughter, I had to nagivate the attitude of "she's old, she must be high risk" of the OB/GYN community.  Now granted, I was 44, and had a multitude of surgeries and fertility problems behind me, but a number of my problems were caused by the fertility treatments themselves.  I had a completely normal pregnancy and a normal delivery, but the well-meaning medical personnel just couldn't accept that I was a normal pregnant women who just happened to be 44.  As a result, I had every test in the book, multiple ultrasounds, consultations with perinatologists and on and on.  As hard as they tried, they just couldn't find anything wrong!

READ THE FULL ARTICLE ON PREGNANCY OVER 40 HERE (getpregnantover40.com)

Friday, October 24, 2014

THYROID, PREGNANCY AND INFANT OUTCOMES

Thyroid Functioning Could Affect Having A Baby and Health Of Baby

Thyroid problems and pregnancy complications It seems that the thyroid gland is not only a critical piece of getting pregnant and staying pregnant, but it's proper functioning is also important for the health of your unborn baby.
Here is an article that discusses how maternal hypothyroidism can affect the baby's vision:

Children of women with hypothyroidism an under active thyroid who had elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in the first and second trimesters of pregnancy, had a significantly reduced ability to see visual contrasts, compared to women with hypothyroidism with normal TSH levels during the first two trimesters, and pregnant women with normal thyroid levels, according to a new study being presented on Thursday, Oct. 4, at the 78th Annual Meeting of the American Thyroid Association (ATA) in New York. Adequate contrast sensitivity is an important ability for reading, viewing information of low contrast such as maps, and visuospatial ability in general.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE ARTICLES ON PREGNANCY AND THYROID PROBLEMS (getpregnantover40.com) 

 The study shows that visual processing problems among infants of women with hypothyroidism were directly correlated with the mothers' high level of TSH. These findings suggest that thyroid hormone is critical in early pregnancy for normal development of visual processing abilities.

A previous study showed that infants born to women who had hypothyroidism diagnosed prior to or during pregnancy had reduced ability to see visual contrasts and that the severity of their deficit was related to how hypothyroid their mothers were during the pregnancy. This research was based on an electrophysiological task where children saw bars that swept from low to high levels of contrast at a slow speed.

from: (www.medicalnewstoday.com)

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

FLU IN PREGNANCY MAY AFFECT FETAL BRAIN

Compromised immune system in pregnancy can make you susceptible to the flu

I know there has been some worry about getting the flu vaccine in pregnancy, but the actual flu may be problematic as well.  Flu season is right around the corner so this information could be timely for pregnant women.
 Pregnant women are thought to have a somewhat compromised immune system which is the body's way of protecting the pregnancy.  This is so your own immune system doesn't attach the embryo thinking it's a foreign intruder.

SEE ALSO: INFECTIONS, INFERTILITY AND PREGNANCY (getpregnantover40.com 

In pregnancy, the flu may affect a fetus and their brain
This article is scary because it talks about flu in pregnancy and even though it was done in monkeys, it may show us how flu could affect a human fetus and their brain.

THE brains of monkeys whose mothers had flu while pregnant resemble those of people with schizophrenia. The finding backs up studies in people that suggest flu in mothers-to-be affects the brain of the developing fetus.

Previous research had found that the children of women who caught flu while pregnant are more likely to develop schizophrenia later in life. To investigate further, Sarah Short and Chris Coe at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, infected 12 pregnant rhesus monkeys with mild flu.

Their 19 offspring seemed to develop normally. Yet MRI scans of the 1-year-old juveniles - equivalent in age to a 5 to 7-year-old human child - revealed that their brains had features similar to those seen in people with schizophrenia, including less grey matter in the cortex and enlarged ventricles. Monkeys whose mothers had not had flu did not have these features (Biological Psychiatry, DOI: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2009.11.026).


from: (newsientist.com)

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